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2 Interesting Facts about Period 7 Elements

2 Interesting Facts about Period 7 Elements

Welcome to part 6 in the Chemical Element Facts Series! Discover interesting facts about period 7 chemical elements in the periodic table and embark on a chemical journey!

87. Facts – Francium

Francium facts
  • Even as early as 1870, scientists believed there would be another element in the alkali metals family that was higher than caesium, going to far as to predict it at number eighty-seven.
  • Its occurrence in uranium minerals is believed to be only one francium atom for every 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 (one quintillion) atoms of uranium.

88. Facts – Radium

Radium facts
  • Radium is the heaviest alkaline earth metal, according to Encyclopedia. The other alkali earth metals include beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium.
  • According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, radium typically enters the body when it is breathed in or swallowed. Health effects from radium exposure include cancer, anemia, cataracts, and death.

104. Facts – Rutherfordium

Rutherfordium facts
  • It was named after Ernest Rutherford, the chemist and physicist who became known as the father of nuclear physics.
  • As a synthetic element, rutherfordium can be synthesized in a lab, but is not naturally occurring on Earth.

105. Facts – Dubnium

Dubnium facts
  • As early as 1976, scientists began attempting to synthesize Dubnium using cold fusion reactions.
  • There are sixteen isotopes of Dubnium, the most recent discovery of which took place in 2009 with the isolation of Db-270.

106. Facts – Seaborgium

Seaborgium facts
  • Earlier that same year (June), researchers at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia had reported discovering element 106. The Soviet team produced element 106 by bombarding a lead target with chromium ions.
  • Experiments with seaborgium have shown it exhibits chemical properties similar to tungsten, its lighter homologue on the periodic table (i.e., located directly above it). It’s also chemically similar to molybdenum.

107. Facts – Bohrium

Bohrium facts
  • Eleven radioactive isotopes have been discovered, the most stable of which has a half-life of possibly between 54 seconds and ninety minutes.
  • Bohrium’s group is known for its +7 oxidation state, which becomes even more stable as it descends.

108. Facts – Hassium

Hassium facts
  • Peter Armbruster, Gottfried Munzenberg, and their colleagues discovered hassium in 1984, around the same time that they discovered bohrium.
  • The highly controversial Transfermium Wars, referring to the elements after fermium in which the IUPAC settled disputes over elements 104 through 108, led to the assigning of a placeholder in position 108 until hassium could be synthesized.

109. Facts – Meitnerium

Meitnerium facts
  • Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”. 
  • Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

110. Facts – Darmstadtium

Darmstadtium facts
  • In order to synthesize one atom of the element, researchers fired countless billions of nickel atoms at a lead target over the course of several days.
  • As a d-block transactinide element, Darmstadtium is a member of the group ten elements in is in the seventh period.

111. Facts – Roentgenium

Roentgenium facts
  • Roentgenium was first made by research scientists at the Heavy Ion Research Laboratory in Darmstadt, Germany in 1994.
  • Roentgenium is a synthetic radioactive metal, created via nuclear bombardment, and has only been produced in minute amounts.

112. Facts – Copernicium

Copernicium facts
  • Copernicium has 5 isotopes whose half-lives are known with mass numbers from 277 to 285. None are stable. The most stable isotope is 285Cn, with a half-life of 34 seconds.
  • Copernicium is a synthetic radioactive metal, created via nuclear bombardment, and has only been produced in minute amounts. Copernicium is produced by bombarding 208Pb with 70Zn in a heavy ion accelerator.

114. Facts – Flerovium

Flerovium facts
  • Flerovium is named for Russian physicist Georgy Flyorov, founder of the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia, where the element was discovered.
  • Element 114’s electron configuration is [Rn] 5f14 6d10 7s2 7p2. As a result of relativistic effects, element 114 has three outer p orbitals with different symmetries: p1/2 (m=1/2), p3/2 (m=1/2), p3/2 (m=3/2). (In lighter elements the three p orbitals px, py, pz are symmetrical.)

116. Facts – Livermorium

Livermorium facts
  • It is expected to be solid and classified as a metal. It is a member of the chalcogen group. 
  • The scientists who created livermorium bombarded curium atoms with calcium ions, producing livermorium and four free neutrons.

Other Articles in this Series:

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei.  gota gota gota gota gota gota gota goa goa goa goa goa

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei.  gota gota gota gota gota gota gota goa goa goa goa goa

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei.  gota gota gota gota gota gota gota goa goa goa goa goa

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

Placeholder names for the element, before its formal discovery, included eka-iridium and unnilennium (symbol Une). However, most people simply referred to it as “element 109”.  Meitnerium is a man-made element that does not occur in nature. It was first synthesized by a German research team led by Peter Armbruster and Gottfried Munzenberg in 1982 at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. A single atom of the isotope meitnerium-266 was observed from bombardment of a bismuth-209 target with accelerated iron-58 nuclei. 

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